WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS

WORKSHOP PRESENTATIONS

WORKSHOP STREAMS

The workshop sessions have been scheduled into the program agenda by streams, so conference participants can easily zero in on sessions most relevant to their discipline or practice. These are only guidelines to help you choose from the over 65 concurrent workshops being offered.

LDP Leadership/Systems/Integration CLN    Research, Scientific/Advanced Clinical Practice
  • Hospice Executive Directors
  • Program Administrators
  • Policy Makers
  • Palliative Care and Family Physicians
  • Nurses, Case Managers, Care Coordinators
  • Advance Palliative Care Practitioners
  • Other Care Providers
PSBCT   Psychosocial, Spiritual, Bereavement,
Complementary Therapy
VOL    Volunteer Management
  • Social Workers
  • Pastoral and Spiritual Care Workers
  • Practitioners Providing Complementary Modalities
  • Anyone Interested in the Psychosocial Aspects of Palliative Care
  • Volunteer Managers
  • Volunteer Coordinators

 

Sunday, April 22, 2018

1:00 pm – 2:15 pm CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS – SERIES 100
Session # Stream Session Title & Speakers
101 LDP

Developing an Ontario Palliative Care Competency Framework
Developing an Ontario Palliative Care Competency Framework
Advancing High Quality, High Value Palliative Care in Ontario: A Declaration of Partnership and Commitment to Action(2011) acknowledged gaps in standardized palliative care education and training. These gaps have resulted in a shortage of health care professionals and volunteers with sufficient education in palliative care, and a lack of palliative care expertise and specialized resources for long-term care homes and primary care settings. A shared priority to establish consistent and standardized education and competency requirements for all levels of care provision across care settings was identified. To address these needs, the Ontario Palliative Care Network established a Provincial Education Steering Committee (PESC) to develop recommendations on the required competencies for health care providers delivering palliative care. In reviewing existing work focused on palliative care competencies, the PESC identified the development of a Palliative Care Competency Framework that was underway by the Nova Scotia Health Authority. Recognizing the rigorous and comprehensive process that was implemented to develop their framework, the PESC elected to leverage both their framework and their development approach, and adapt this to the Ontario context.
This workshop will focus on providing an overview of the development process, and sharing the draft Ontario Competency Framework. The primary objective will be to gain feedback on the draft framework from the diverse perspectives of the workshop participants.
Speaker: Tara Walton MPH, Team Lead, Clinician Engagement, Ontario Palliative Care Network; The OPCN Provincial Education Steering Committee

102 LDP
Developing Meaningful Relationships with First Nations Communities & Providers: the Northwestern Ontario Experience
Developing Meaningful Relationships with First Nations Communities & Providers: the Northwestern Ontario Experience
The goal of the North West LHIN Regional Palliative Care Program (RPCP) is to create an integrated system of care that will serve all individuals who could benefit from a palliative approach, regardless of prognosis, diagnosis, or geographical location. In the North West LHIN region there are more than 60 First Nations communities and 21.5% of the population identifies as Indigenous. The North West RPCP has therefore put a significant effort into engaging with First Nations stakeholders around the topics of palliative and end-of-life care in order to identify their communities’ strengths and challenges as well as opportunities to collaborate on solutions. During this workshop, the RPCP team will describe the approaches it has taken to build meaningful relationships with its First Nations partners and will provide examples of the types of engagement done to date. The RPCP team will also share  lessons learned thus far and demonstrate to participants how to get started in doing this work in their own community or organization.
Speakers: Jill Marcella MSW, RSW, Coordinator, North West LHIN Regional Palliative Care Program; Hilary Mettam BHSc, MPH, Community Development Lead, North West LHIN Regional Palliative Care Program
103 LDP
Dwell in Possibility: Striving for Equity in Hospice (part 1)
Dwell in Possibility: Striving for Equity in Hospice (part 1)

In this dynamic workshop, we explore important questions related to equity in hospice care: Who do you see? Who do you not see? Who makes decisions? Whose voice is heard? How are you supporting an equity-informed approach in your organization?   

This two-part workshop promotes critical questioning among those working or volunteering in hospice services in order to inspire equity-informed organizations and services and to explore possibilities for change. This will lead to improvements in how hospice services support the needs of all people, including individuals who are structurally vulnerable.

The first session focuses on the concept of equity – what does it mean and why is it essential for Ontario hospice services to embrace? We briefly explore the historical and sociopolitical context of hospice care to understand inherited discourses and our current context and thereby inform our direction forward.

The second session features an interactive panel centring the voices of people who have been impacted by inequity, and hospice service providers who are engaged in equity-informed initiatives. The panelists share their experiences to lead us in exploring opportunities for change.  

This workshop is an invitation to engage in critical questioning and collaborative reflection to inspire a more equitable design and delivery of hospice services.

Authors:

Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services at HPCO
Charlotte Scott BSW student intern at HPCO
Ligaya Byrch MA, CHE, MSW, RSW
Elise Skinner BA, MScN, RN
Michelle Williams BSW, MSW student intern at Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice
Ron Lirette
Amy Pritzker BA, BSW, RSW

Speakers: Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services, HPCO; Charlotte Scott BSW student intern, HPCO; Ligaya Byrch MA, CHE, MSW, RSW; Elise Skinner BA, MScN, RN; Michelle Williams BSW, MSW student intern, Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice; Ron Lirette; Amy Pritzker BA, BSW, RSW
104 LDP
Advance Care Planning - Catalyst for Social Change
Advance Care Planning - Catalyst for Social Change
In 2015, a unique initiative was launched in Waterloo Wellington (WW) that sought to demonstrate how a population health approach could be implemented to achieve sustainable change in ACP understanding and practice across all sectors. Hosted by Hospice Waterloo Region in partnership with Hospice Wellington and funded by the local health integration network (LHIN), this three year ACP Project, “Conversations Worth Having” (CWH) reached out to community and health care settings as critical sites for engagement and education, demonstrating that connecting community professionals, health care providers and the public is essential to achieve meaningful change.   Local lawyers, estate planners, faith leaders, community agencies, hospitals, long term care homes and primary care teams collaborated with project staff and steering committee champions to build an ACP movement across the WW LHIN with the goal of correct advance care planning conversations across the continuum of care, beginning with conversations in one’s living room.  The evidence informed evaluation and research process of active innovation and engagement has been fundamental to this project’s success.  This model demonstrates how an ACP initiative built on community partnerships and community engagement as crucial components can be a foundation for a Compassionate Communities approach to palliative care .  This workshop will share learnings on the successful launch of a population health approach to change, engaging community where we live work and pray while also demonstrating how ACP can be used to engage the community around end of life experiences, building a strong foundation for Compassionate Communities within Waterloo Wellington.
Speakers: Sheli O’Connor MSW, RSW, Social Worker, Hospice Waterloo Region; Christine Bigelow RN, BScN, CHPCN(C), Palliative Nurse Consultant, HPC Consultation Services Waterloo Wellington
105 LDP
Stratim Portal Toolset for HPCO Member Hospices
Stratim Portal Toolset for HPCO Member Hospices

We live in a world with increasing demands for reporting and accountability. The Stratim framework is designed to help organizations plan, communicate, organize, monitor and report on organizational performance. 

Stratim has created an integrated framework and toolset built upon general best practices in areas such as: strategic planning; project management; quality improvement; risk management; governance; and organizational change. These have been enhanced and integrated:

  • To leverage and integrate with the work done on the HPCO metrics project;
  • To support evolving HPCO accreditation standards; and HQO reporting and quality improvement requirements.
  • For consistency across the best practice areas;
  • For appropriateness in health and social service settings;
  • For simple, consistent pragmatic data collection, reporting and analysis.

Using the Stratim platform, which has been specifically adapted for HPCO, you will save time and effort, eliminate frustration and ensure consistency with evolving standards. Without it, organizations will probably need to cobble together their own tools using things like Excel and PowerPoint… requiring a lot more thought, time and effort to try to keep up.

The partnership between HPCO and Stratim will allow HPCO members to improve organizational performance and reporting as well as maintain consistency with evolving best practices in a consistent, cost-effective manner.

Author:Brian Tramontini, President and CEO, Stratim.

Speaker: Brian Tramontini, President and CEO, Stratim

106 CLN
The social determinants of health in life and death: Research and promising practices in three Canadian cities to improve access to palliative care for structurally vulnerable people
The social determinants of health in life and death: Research and promising practices in three Canadian cities to improve access to palliative care for structurally vulnerable people
People who experience a deficit in the social determinants of health (SDOH) including inadequate housing, poverty, and racialization, as well as high rates of mental health and substance use, and stigmatization of diseases such as HIV/AIDS, are often underserved by current palliative care services. “Structurally vulnerable” people have fewer social supports, lack financial resources, adequate and ‘safe’ housing for formal care provision, and often die in places that do not meet their unique needs, alone, or in the care of workers who have limited training and support to provide quality palliative care. In this workshop we will draw on our experiences of working with structurally vulnerable people through the Palliative Education And Care for the Homeless (PEACH) program in Toronto and the newly developed, Calgary’s Allied Mobile Palliative Response Program (CAMPP), and findings from a three-year ethnographic study in Victoria examining access to palliative care for structurally vulnerable people.
 
Responses to this public health issue require community-led, participatory partnerships. In this interactive workshop, we will engage participants in conversations related to promising practices to improve access to high quality palliative care for individuals experiencing structural vulnerabilities, and encourage (re)conceptualizations and (re)orientation of home, family, and caregiving. 
Speakers: Naheed Dosani MD, CCFP(PC), BSc, Palliative Care Physician, Lecturer, University of Toronto Department of Family and Community Medicine: Division of Palliative Care, Assistant Clinical Professor, McMaster University Department of Family Medicine: Division of Palliative Care, Project Founder, Inner City Health Associates: PEACH (Palliative Education And Care for the Homeless) Program, Palliative Care Physician, William Osler Health System: Division of Supportive and Palliative Care; Kelli Stajduhar RN, PhD, FCAHS, Professor, School of Nursing and Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health, University of Victoria; Sandy Buchman MD, CCFP(PC), FCFP, Palliative Care Physician, Inner City Health Associates, PEACH (Palliative Education And Care for the Homeless), Assistant Professor, Department of Family & Community Medicine: Division of Palliative Care; Namarig Ahmed MN, RN, CDE, Community Nurse Coordinator, Inner City Health Associates, PEACH (Palliative Education And Care for the Homeless)
107 CLN
Full Code or DNR? An Approach to Goals of Care Discussions in a Larger Cultural Context
Full Code or DNR? An Approach to Goals of Care Discussions in a Larger Cultural Context
Palliative Care Providers face challenges engaging in goals of care conversations, which often include a conversation about cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR). When patients or families make decisions that conflict with provider recommendations, this can present ethical and legal difficulties.We will explore several different variables and how they influence CPR outcomes. We will discuss the variety of external factors and sources of information that may inform patients’ decision making.The workshop will look at certain controversial changes made by regulatory bodies impacting CPR decision making.  How do we define “futility” from an ethical perspective? What are some of the cultural and community based values which could impact decision making and be driving aggressive care? Could there even be a small subset of patients where “sham CPR” could show compassion and caring?  Is there a point at which the needs of the patient become less important than the needs of the family and community at large? This workshop should allow providers to gain a better understanding of how different cultures view end of life decision making and provide them with tools to approach these potentially difficult situations. Cultural factors affect all areas of medicine but can be especially relevant when discussing wishes around end of life care. Different cultures may vary in how they approach informed consent, shared decision making, and end of life care. This may clash with established practices in our healthcare system, causing stress and uncertainty for patients, families, and providers.
Speakers: Amit Arya MD, CCFP, FCFP, Physician, Palliative Care Physician, Brampton Civic Hospital: William Osler Health System, Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Lecturer, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto; John (Roddy) Davey MD, CCFP (PC), Palliative Care Physician, Palliative Care Physician, Brampton Civic Hospital, William Osler Health System, Assistant Clinical Professor, Division of Palliative Care, Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University
108 PSBCT
Helping Children and Teens Understand Medical Assistance In Dying
Helping Children and Teens Understand Medical Assistance In Dying
“Children and Teens can handle the known…..it is the unknown that they can not handle.”
We live in a death denying culture that says: “don’t talk…..don’t feel……don’t trust…..and don’t change”.  We are also living in a time of great change.  The practice of MAID is new and there has not been enough reflective practice and observation on how to have a conversation with children and teens concerning MAID.  As a result, children and teens are not being included in the discussion.
This workshop will explore the key concepts and practical tools in helping chidren and teens undertand the death of a loved one when MAID is chosen.   Participants will review the following themes:
1. The first part of the workshop will assist participants in reviewing their beliefs and values concerning medical assistance in dying to help with the integrity of the discussion with children and teens.
2. Current pratices and theories on helping children to exress their thoughts and feeling concerning their dying loved one.
3. Understanding the philosophy of suicied prevention and how this is different from the understanding of MAID.
4. Helping children and teens complete a life review focused on searching for meaning and purpose with their loved one that is dying in light of the decison to choose MAID.
This workshop will use the “C.H.I.L.D. Grief Model” as a tool to help staff, children, teens and family members.
The “Emotional Mind / Wise Mind / Intellectual Mind concept will also be use to explore this issue.
Speaker: Eugene Dufour B.A., MDiv., CFT, Bereavement and Trauma Specialist, Stratford Perth Rotary Hosice – Huron Residential Hospice
109 PSBCT
Social Work Practice in Residential Hospice: Resident and Family Needs Predicted by PPS
Social Work Practice in Residential Hospice: Resident and Family Needs Predicted by PPS
Social Workers in residential hospice conduct intentional conversations with residents and family members. Many of these conversations are intuitive and are led by the needs of the residents and family members. Which conversations are needed are influenced by the Performance Palliative Scale (PPS) score of the resident. Often there is only one social worker working on a team of other staff and volunteers, and the unique role and contribution of the social worker may not be well defined.

This workshop will describe preliminary qualitative research results conducted at Bethell Hospice based on simplified versions based on Grounded Theory and Phenomenological Research. The results demonstrate that knowing the PPS of a resident may help anticipate the psychosocial conversation needs of that resident and their family throughout their stay in the residential hospice. Anticipating needs also allows for the identification of relevant hospice palliative care knowledge from a psychosocial perspective and a thorough list of social work competencies for any residential social worker. Participants will leave with a list of specific conversational topics relevant to residents and family members at end of life.
Speakers: Linda Hochstetler MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker/Therapist, Bethell Hospice; Nazira Jaffer B.Sc.,MHA,MBA,CHE, Independent Health Care Advisor; Carolyn Smith, MSW student specializing in palliative and hospice care, Bethell Hospice
110 PSBCT
An Indigenous “Circle of Palliative Care”: Exploring culturally appropriate care with a multi-disciplinary team of Indigenous health care providers
An Indigenous “Circle of Palliative Care”: Exploring culturally appropriate care with a multi-disciplinary team of Indigenous health care providers
There has been an increasing awareness in our society of Indigenous Knowledge utilization in the health care of Indigenous peoples. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission  Calls to Action on Health made clear recommendations to acknowledge the value of traditional healing practices and to increase the number of Indigenous health professionals.  Indigenous people often choose to use traditional healing practices in harmony with western medicine and are requesting space to conduct healing and end-of-life ceremonies in all health care settings. Western health care providers are beginning to recognize that building relationships are fundamental to working effectively with Indigenous patients and their families. However, in the provision of holistic palliative care it is also essential to build relationships and foster collaboration among Indigenous and non-Indigenous health care providers, including Healers and Elders. This workshop is intended for Indigenous and non-Indigenous health care providers who are interested in exploring how each of their roles bring unique gifts that complete the Circle of Palliative Care. 
Speakers: Amy Montour BScN, MSc, MD, Regional Aboriginal Clinical Lead and Regional Palliative Care Co-Lead, Hamilton Niagara Haldimand Brant Local Health Integration Network, Regional Cancer Program and Regional Palliative Care Network; Joanna Vatour BSW, RSW, Lead, First Nations Inuit Métis Engagement, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit and OPCN Secretariat
111 VOL
Self as Instrument of Service: Training HPC Volunteers in the Art of Presence and Patient/Family-Centred Care (part 1)
Self as Instrument of Service: Training HPC Volunteers in the Art of Presence and Patient/Family-Centred Care (part 1)
The greatest gift in HPC that we can give one another is presence and attention.  Awareness of ourselves and our worldview lenses helps to develop this capacity and enables us to view the people we serve as unique, holistic beings, honouring their distinctive end of life and grief experiences as we journey with them.  
 
Training is designed to give volunteers opportunities to explore and understand their thoughts, feelings and experiences related to death, dying and bereavement as well as challenges and opportunities for learning/serving in cross-cultural encounters. This experiential training approach encompasses principles of equity and inclusion and acknowledges the many social factors that impact peoples’ unique end of life and grief experiences. Training also aids in recognizing the impact of biases and discrimination on individuals and families accessing HPC.
 
As Ontario`s population ages and diversifies, HPC staff and volunteers must continually update and refine their “tried and true” methods of training and program development in order to meet these growing community needs.  It is also important to reflect our changing population in the diverse bodies leading the sessions. Consideration of equity, flexibility, commitment and “outside the box” thinking may be required of HPC programs to allocate resources for more than one presenter/educator/volunteer trainer. This strategy could include partnering with other community organizations, training seasoned volunteers and possibly offering a stipend to outside facilitators in order to ensure a training team with a diverse set of lenses, experiences and wisdom.
Speakers: Betty Ann Rutledge, Professional Volunteer Manager, Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities; Andrea Kwan MSW, RSW, Grief Counsellor, Educator and Registered Social Worker
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS – SERIES 200
Session # Stream Session Title & Speakers
201 LDP
An Extensive Look at the Western Model of Palliative Care Delivery: A Focus on Diversity and Cultural
An Extensive Look at the Western Model of Palliative Care Delivery: A Focus on Diversity and Cultural

Palliative care began in England and over the years has developed in other countries in particular western societies. According to the 2015 Quality of Death Index, the United Kingdom was ranked number one in the world, followed by the United States in 9th place and Canada in 11th. Countries in Africa and Asia were ranked very low, which illustrates the lack of palliative care resources and knowledge in these parts of the world. Western societies represent diverse communities from these countries which have very little exposure to palliative care. Providing care to these populations often pose challenges when delivering care as it is not a one size fits all model. Within western societies, cultural diversity is a social and economic reality and the healthcare system has not been fully developed to cater to these cultural sensitives (Toms,1997; Toms, Hodge, & Pullen-Smith, 1998). The western model delivery of palliative care is in need of building their capacity to bridge the gap between palliative care and diversity. As we know, the social determinants of health play a role in  how people receive care and in some cases their illnesses. Therefore, understanding the unique needs of different cultural, religions and marginalized groups is imperative when thinking about the provision of palliative care.
This presentation will have three focuses:

  1. Understanding the challenges of delivering a western based model of palliative care to a diverse population.
  2. Identifying the opportunities for improving the provision of palliative care based on cultural sensitivity and diversity.
  3. Engage in a knowledge exchange based on the participants experiences with this phenomenon.
Speakers: Nadine Persaud BSW, MSW, RSW, PhD Candidate, Social Worker, Kensington Health Centre and Lancaster University; Dr. Sandy Buchman BA, MD, CCFP, FCFP, Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care and the University of Toronto
202 LDP
Strengthening Impact through Leadership in Systems Collaboration
Strengthening Impact through Leadership in Systems Collaboration
Systems collaboration is widely understood to be an effective and necessary approach to achieving maximum impact in human service sectors. Most funding contracts require service providers to work together to achieve an increasingly higher standard of community collaboration and demonstrated collective impact.  While organizations work diligently and tirelessly to collaborate within their sector, it is most often TIME restraints that gets in the way of collective work.  Opportunity to share important information, develop data sharing processes, support each other and better serve their clients may be compromised. Attention to equitable approaches in systems requires understanding, intention and accountability and is critical to collective leadership strategies.
The Children and Youth Grief network started 4 years ago as a few organizations in the grief and bereavement sector in Peel and Halton and developed a vision that every child and youth would have honest information and well-informed support when someone they care about is dying or has died.  Today, the network has established a growing membership, including many organizations serving the GTA and is striving to serve as a time-efficient vehicle that uses broadly established as well as current and local research, including diverse demographics, to build the capacity of its’ members, improve access to information for all and to exchange knowledge in the growing grief and bereavement system.

This session will highlight the collective approach used and all the practical ideas that others could employ to build leadership and an equitable and evidence-informed grief system in any community.
Speaker: Julie Pehar MEd, Director, Children and Youth Grief Network
203 LDP
Dwell in Possibility: Striving for Equity in Hospice (part 2)
Dwell in Possibility: Striving for Equity in Hospice (part 2)

In this dynamic workshop, we explore important questions related to equity in hospice care: Who do you see? Who do you not see? Who makes decisions? Whose voice is heard? How are you supporting an equity-informed approach in your organization?   

This two-part workshop promotes critical questioning among those working or volunteering in hospice services in order to inspire equity-informed organizations and services and to explore possibilities for change. This will lead to improvements in how hospice services support the needs of all people, including individuals who are structurally vulnerable.

The first session focuses on the concept of equity – what does it mean and why is it essential for Ontario hospice services to embrace? We briefly explore the historical and sociopolitical context of hospice care to understand inherited discourses and our current context and thereby inform our direction forward.

The second session features an interactive panel centring the voices of people who have been impacted by inequity, and hospice service providers who are engaged in equity-informed initiatives. The panelists share their experiences to lead us in exploring opportunities for change.  

This workshop is an invitation to engage in critical questioning and collaborative reflection to inspire a more equitable design and delivery of hospice services.

Authors: Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services at HPCO
Charlotte Scott BSW student intern at HPCO, Ligaya Byrch MA, CHE, MSW, RSW, Elise Skinner BA, MScN, RN, Michelle Williams BSW, MSW student intern at Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice, Ron Lirette, Amy Pritzker BA, BSW, RSW

Speakers: Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services, HPCO; Charlotte Scott BSW student intern, HPCO; Ligaya Byrch MA, CHE, MSW, RSW; Elise Skinner BA, MScN, RN; Michelle Williams BSW, MSW student intern, Dr. Bob Kemp Hospice; Ron Lirette; Amy Pritzker BA, BSW, RSW
204 LDP
Fundraising within the Social Media Landscape
Fundraising within the Social Media Landscape
Session description will be available soon.
205 LDP
Practical Tips for Management of Advanced Heart Failure
Practical Tips for Management of Advanced Heart Failure

Heart failure is associated with high morbidity and mortality and is one of the primary reasons for hospital admission in the elderly. There is an increasing awareness in the heart failure community for partnering with palliative care providers in supporting holistic patient care, especially when patients experience advanced symptoms. As such, there is a growing request for palliative care providers to support patients with heart failure.  The purpose of this workshop is to provide a general overview of heart failure management using case scenarios. Key topics include pathophysiology, patient fluid assessment and common pharmacological and non-pharmacological management, as guided by the newly published 2017 heart failure guidelines by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society.   The role of common implantable cardiac devices and end-of-life planning, will also be discussed. Using case scenarios, participants will explore practical tips for assessment and management of patient with advanced heart failure symptoms.

Speaker: Karen Harkness RN PhD CCN(C) CHFN, Clinical Strategist for Heart Failure, CorHealth Ontario and Dr. Robert McKelvie, MD, PhD, FRCPC, Professor of Medicine – Heart Failure, Cardiac Rehabilitation and Secondary Prevention Program, Division of Cardiology Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry, Western University.

206 CLN
Enhancing access to evidence based training in the management of grief and loss and depression through standardized online education
Enhancing access to evidence based training in the management of grief and loss and depression through standardized online education

Demand for high quality palliative care is increasing in community and institutional settings.  To meet the demand, healthcare providers require educational support to recognize when palliative care services are appropriate, and have the confidence in delivering high quality palliative care to Canadians.

This workshop describes de Souza Institute oncology and palliative care course series on assessment and management of psychosocial issues in cancer, based on the 2015 Pan Canadian Clinical Practice Guidelines on psychosocial care (www.capo.ca).  More specifically, the presentation will focus on two important areas of end of life care in cancer: 1) the experience of grief and loss among cancer patients and their families, assessment of losses in the person with illness, and effective person-centred therapeutic interventions; 2) a comprehensive review on the assessment and management of depression and anxiety, how to assess risk for suicide and differentiate it from the desire for hastened death or a rational decision for MAID.

The workshop presentation will include didactic teaching and interactive activities.  We will demonstrate online modules including: evidence based comprehensive symptom assessment and management; a person-centred approach working with patients and families; case illustrations and video demonstration on best practice in the management of psychosocial issues during end of life care. Quantitative and qualitative data will be presented on learning experiences among 150 clinicians who participated in online learning. More specifically, we will describe participants’ perceived areas of challenges, and their improvements in knowledge and confidence in psychosocial care following the online education and training.

Speakers: Dr. Mary Jane Esplen, Vice- Chair, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, and Executive Director, de Souza Institute, University Health Network; Dr. Madeline Li FRCP(C), University Health Network – Princess Margaret Cancer Centre; Dr. Jiahui Wong Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, de Souza Institute/UHN
207 CLN
Medical Marijuana (MMJ) in Palliative Care
Medical Marijuana (MMJ) in Palliative Care

Clinical evidence is present for the use of medical marijuana (MMJ) in the palliative treatment of nausea, appetite stimulation and analgesia. The differences between synthetic and plant-source cannabinoids and their implications on treatment will be examined, as will the ratio of THC/cannabinoid in plant MMJ and its influence on symptom management.

The clinically based evidence surrounding the use of MMJ in chronic pain treatment is dubious at best. There is however a growing scientific literature on the benefits of cannabis in symptom management in cancer care. Studies supporting this premise will be examined. 

Remarkable advances have been made toward understanding the neurochemistry of cannabinoids, sparked by the discovery of endogenous cannabinoids and receptors. This has led to further hypotheses regarding potential therapeutic applications for cannabinoids.

Cannabis as a clinical intervention for people experiencing non-oncologic palliative care, including those with life-threatening chronic illness such as multiple sclerosis and motor neuron disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will also be examined.

Unlike hospice, long-term drug safety is an important issue in palliative medicine. Opioids may produce significant morbidity. Cannabis is a safer alternative with broad applicability for palliative care.

Speaker: Dr. Rohit Kumar, CEO, R.T. Medical Research and Patient Advocacy Corporation
208 PSBCT
KidsGrief.ca: Online modules for adults supporting grieving children
KidsGrief.ca: Online modules for adults supporting grieving children
The death of a significant person represents one of the most powerful disruptions in all aspects of a child’s emotional existence. Yet there is little guidance available to adults who are supporting children through the dying and death of a family member or friend. Adults often struggle to determine how involved the child should be with the person who is dying, what language to use, and how much information to share. While many families seek guidance from healthcare providers and educators, few of these professionals receive training on the topic, and lack confidence in providing the level of support they would like to provide to families and students. 
 
National children’s grief expert and Virtual Hospice clinical team member, Andrea Warnick has led a team of grief experts and family advisors to develop KidsGrief.ca. These learning modules equip educators, healthcare providers, parents, and others with evidence-based grief support strategies for children aged 2 – 18. Topics include: teachable moments, such as the death of a pet; preparing kids to be at the bedside of someone who is dying; informing kids about a death; explaining Medical Assistance in Dying, and suicide; and more.
 
KidsGrief.ca will help bridge the gap that currently exists between the literature and practice when it comes to supporting children who are experiencing the dying or death of someone close to them.
 
This interactive workshop will give participants the opportunity to explore their own questions, concerns and barriers in terms of supporting grieving children, and to experience the resource.
Speaker: Andrea Warnick RN, MA, RP, Grief therapist, Clinical Team member, Canadian Virtual Hospice
209 PSBCT
Complementary Therapy Approaches
Complementary Therapy Approaches

The authors will look at the last 5 years to see how complementary therapy approaches have grown and been integrated in several organisations – hospitals, residential and visiting hospices. 

In addition to Massage/Aromatherapy, Reflexology, Therapeutic Touch and Reiki,  a new modality using ‘touch’ has recently been developed. General hospice volunteers can now be trained to provide simple massage/aromatherapy to clients and family caregivers for comfort and support. Service evaluations have shown that patients benefit from these modalities.  Conference participants will experience how to give/receive a simple neck and shoulder massage.

Art has been used by people over the centuries as a therapeutic way of communicating and expressing their thoughts and feelings.  The use of Art Therapy in palliative care however is growing.  “Art Therapist” is the professional and protected title that denotes members of the Canadian Art Therapy Association. Similarly, music is used therapeutically in many environments and personally by individuals.  However, Music Therapy is a discipline in which professionals are accredited by the Canadian Association of Music Therapists.

Dr. Kevin Komisaruk from the University of Toronto has developed a performance-based modality for palliative patients called Music at Bedside, which combines clinical empathy with nuance in musical interpretation, designed to increase the communicative potential of music. Experience has shown that this music connects with many people in end-of-life care.
 
“Complementary” means working “alongside”. In this presentation the authors show how complementary therapies are helping palliative patients and their families in a number of organisations, alongside conventional medical and nursing interventions.

Speakers: Marianne Tavares MSc CAHP, Complementary Therapy Consultant, Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital, Hill House Hospice; Anahita Kiani CATA/ACAT, RP, CRPO, Art Therapist and Psychotherapist, Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital
210 PSBCT
Listening & Responding Made Easier: Practical Tools for the Toughest Questions in Palliative Care
Listening & Responding Made Easier: Practical Tools for the Toughest Questions in Palliative Care
This workshop will offer conference participants practical tips and recommendations for best practices in optimizing client care and the compassion they deliver. The session is designed to equip participants with tools, comfort and confidence when they face the toughest, gut-wrenching, competency challenging questions or statements presented to them by patients receiving palliative care, professional caregivers or family members. Participants will explore some of the most common questions of “Why is this happening to me/him/her?”; “How does my faith support me when I need help the most?”;  and angst such as “I/we had plans for retirement/for the future/for my child!” Additional examples of difficult questions and statements will be solicited from the audience and tabled for discussion later in the session.

In this workshop, participants will learn how best to respond in these circumstances by staving off their anxiety and felt need for an answer and instead tune into the patients’ (may be the patient and/or the caregiver) emotional, spiritual and psychological pain. Participants will then explore safe conversation ‘bridges’  which  acknowledge anxiety while encouraging continued conversation, the ultimate objective. Following the workshop, participants will recognize how a well structured conversation and skill development in the art of deep listening will result in understanding the patient more completely and, for the people whom we serve, feeling deeply listened to and understood. Participants will also be given the tools to recognize the need for and provision of self-care in those most intimate and emotional exchanges.
Speaker: Paul Davidson BA, Chaplain, Emily’s House and Philip Aziz Centre Visiting Hospice
211 VOL
Self as Instrument of Service: Training HPC Volunteers in the Art of Presence and Patient/Family-Centred Care (part2)
Self as Instrument of Service: Training HPC Volunteers in the Art of Presence and Patient/Family-Centred Care (part2)
The greatest gift in HPC that we can give one another is presence and attention.  Awareness of ourselves and our worldview lenses helps to develop this capacity and enables us to view the people we serve as unique, holistic beings, honouring their distinctive end of life and grief experiences as we journey with them.  
 
Training is designed to give volunteers opportunities to explore and understand their thoughts, feelings and experiences related to death, dying and bereavement as well as challenges and opportunities for learning/serving in cross-cultural encounters. This experiential training approach encompasses principles of equity and inclusion and acknowledges the many social factors that impact peoples’ unique end of life and grief experiences. Training also aids in recognizing the impact of biases and discrimination on individuals and families accessing HPC.
 
As Ontario`s population ages and diversifies, HPC staff and volunteers must continually update and refine their “tried and true” methods of training and program development in order to meet these growing community needs.  It is also important to reflect our changing population in the diverse bodies leading the sessions. Consideration of equity, flexibility, commitment and “outside the box” thinking may be required of HPC programs to allocate resources for more than one presenter/educator/volunteer trainer. This strategy could include partnering with other community organizations, training seasoned volunteers and possibly offering a stipend to outside facilitators in order to ensure a training team with a diverse set of lenses, experiences and wisdom.
Speakers: Betty Ann Rutledge, Professional Volunteer Manager, Scarborough Centre for Healthy Communities; Andrea Kwan MSW, RSW, Grief Counsellor, Educator, Registered Social Worker

Monday, April 23, 2018

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10:45 am – 12:00 pm CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS – SERIES 300
Session # Stream Session Title & Speakers
301 LDP
Donor Stewardship and Recognition
Donor Stewardship and Recognition
Session details will be available soon.
302 LDP
What we’ve learned: strengthening palliative care to the homeless and vulnerably housed in Ottawa
What we’ve learned: strengthening palliative care to the homeless and vulnerably housed in Ottawa
In 2017, Ottawa Inner City Health received short-term funding from the Champlain Local Health Integration Network for planning to improve palliative care to homeless and vulnerably housed individuals based on identified gaps in the community’s existing service structure. The project involved stakeholder involvement and consultation as well as several working groups that were focused on different community gaps in access to palliative care including early detection and screening, trauma informed care, personal care, peer support and accompaniment, and standards of care related to the palliative needs of indigenous homeless and vulnerably housed individuals.
 
Centered on enhancing access to palliative care to those most often underserved within mainstream health services, this interactive session describes recommendations and mitigation strategies identified during the six-month planning project and engages participants to reflect on underserved populations in their jurisdictions. Emphasis is placed on enhancing collaboration between homeless primary care providers, furthering the inclusion of people with lived experience of homelessness in the planning and delivery of care at the end of life, and increasing capacity for the spiritual accompaniment of homeless and vulnerably housed individuals.
Speakers: Elise Skinner BA, RN, MScN, Nursing Practice Leader in Palliative Care, Bruyere Continuing Care (Ottawa); Catherine Hacksel; Bob Jamison; Tara Cohen
303 LDP
Health Care Consent & Advance Care Planning: Essential Clinical and Facilitation Skills (part 1)
Health Care Consent & Advance Care Planning: Essential Clinical and Facilitation Skills (part 1)
Two essential skills in the practical application of knowledge related to health care consent (HCC) and advance care planning (ACP) involve abilities to translate information that can effectively guide decision making and consent. For ACP, an essential skill is translating a person’s values to directly inform decision making processes. For consent, an essential skill is determining what would make clinical processes noncompliant with the law. Although one is an advanced communication skill and one is an advanced technical skill, both are required if HCC ACP in Ontario is to be person-centred and at the same time meet legal requirements. For this two-part workshop a unique experiential format will enable participants to personally develop these two essential skills. As well, participants will be introduced to the facilitation tools that can enable skill development in clinicians, policy makers and planners. The session will include critical information to improve understanding of the current HCC ACP climate and practice challenges; will advance knowledge of the linkages between HCC and ACP; and will involve the experiences of applying a person’s values to real life decision-making and the screening of real life clinical processes for legal compliance. Participants will also be introduced to a new Ontario-based e-learning resource that aims to improve HCC ACP related clinical practices.
Speakers: Jeff Myers MD; Nadia Incardona MD; Rachael Halligan MD; Judith Wahl LLB, HCC ACP CoP Leadership Team Members
304 LDP
Leading the Way: HPCO Hospice Standards Framework and Emerging Themes of the HPCO Accreditation process - (part 1)
Leading the Way: HPCO Hospice Standards Framework and Emerging Themes of the HPCO Accreditation process - (part 1)
The HPCO Hospice Standards framework and accreditation process can motivate overall quality improvement within a hospice, promote alignment with organizational policies, and provide a rationale for change to address challenges while ensuring best practice.The purpose of this two-part workshop is to provide an update on the HPCO Hospice Standards framework and a brief overview of the HPCO accreditation process, and to explore the emerging trends and themes of the accreditation process.The first session will focus on the HPCO Hospice Standards framework including the recently updated Day Hospice, Spiritual Care, Grief and Bereavement Support, and Hospice Residence sections.  The current status of the Volunteer Management and Complementary Therapy standards (under review in early 2018) will also be explored. This session provides an opportunity to deepen your familiarity with the HPCO Hospice Standards framework.
The second session will feature members of HPCO’s Accreditation Review Panel and will explore the emerging trends and themes of the accreditation process, which has been operational since June 2015. Attention will be given to both visiting hospice volunteer services and hospice residence services. The presenters will outline key themes they have observed during their tenure as accreditation reviewers.  By reflecting on their experiences, the presenters will draw attention to the value of engaging in the HPCO accreditation process.

Authors:
Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services at HPCO
Charlotte Scott, BSW student intern at HPCO; Nadine Persaud BSW, MSW, RSW, PhD Candidate, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO and Rami Shami BSc, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO
Speakers: Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services, HPCO; Charlotte Scott, BSW student intern, HPCO; Nadine Persaud BSW, MSW, RSW, PhD Candidate, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO
Rami Shami BSc, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO
305 LDP
Palliative Care Quality Standard: Guiding evidence-based, high-quality palliative care in Ontario
Palliative Care Quality Standard: Guiding evidence-based, high-quality palliative care in Ontario
The Ontario Palliative Care Network and Health Quality Ontario are launching a provincial quality standard to describe high-quality palliative care for key areas for improvement in the province of Ontario. The quality standard focuses on care for people with progressive, life-limiting illness, their caregivers, and their healthcare providers. The Palliative Care Quality Standard includes a concise-set of evidence-based, measurable statements with associated quality indicators and supports for implementation. The full package of products, including clinical guide, patient reference guide, InfoBrief, and recommendations for adoption, is slated to launch in Spring 2018 and will be presented to workshop participants.
 
In this workshop, participants will have an opportunity to learn more in-depth about the quality standard, and gain a greater comprehension of the 13 quality statements and how they align with provincial initiatives. Workshop participants will have the opportunity to participate in small group discussions and an interactive activity to put into action one of the recommendations for adoption: participants will assess the care being provided in their respective settings against the quality standard using Health Quality Ontario’s Getting Started Guide and the Quality Standard Measurement Guide as tools to support quality improvement. Participants will take a systematic approach by using an ‘Action Plan Template’ to help prepare a plan for implementing change in practice to align with the care described in the quality standard. The Action Plan Template helps guide an assessment of current practice, identification of barriers and facilitators to change, and to track progress. 
Speakers: Lisa Ye RN, MN, Lead, Quality Standards, Health Quality Ontario; Candace Tse, QI Specialist, Clinical Improvement and Informatics, Health Quality Ontario; Ahmed Jakda MD, MBA Candidate (2018), CFPC(PC), Ontario Palliative Care Network; Melody Boyd RN, BScN, MSc, MN, Operations Director, Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre; Tara Walton MPH, Team Lead, Clinician Engagement, Ontario Palliative Care Network; Naira Yeritsyan MD, Senior Methodologist, Health System Performance, Health Quality Ontario; Taylor Martin MHSc, PEng, Manager (Acting), Ontario Palliative Care Network Secretariat;  Deanna Bryant, Ontario Palliative Care Network
306 CLN
MAID access as an end of life option for patients receiving palliative care: A case review
MAID access as an end of life option for patients receiving palliative care: A case review
Traditionally, the philosophy of Hospice Palliative seeks to neither hasten nor postpone death.  However, with the introduction of Bill C-14 hastening death with medical assistance is now a legal option for Canadians and more and more people are choosing MAID as part of their End of Life care plan.  This workshop will explore why Palliative Care Providers are the most appropriate clinician to be involved in the MAID process.  Using a case review approach this workshop will also discuss the challenges of providing MAID in a small community when the patient and family are well known to the MAID providers.

MAID should be viewed as a final option for those with intolerable suffering.  The Palliative Care Providers are in a unique position as they are able to use their knowledge to ensure all pain and symptom management options have been explored prior to the provision of MAID.  MAID fits into the palliative care philosophy by providing comfort and dignity to the patient and their family while addressing their physical, social, psychological and spiritual needs. Therefore it is our moral and ethical responsibility to include MAID as a part of palliative care.

The case review will discuss Todd, a 46 year old male with colorectal CA secondary to Familial Polyposis (Gardener’s Syndrome) and malignant small bowel obstructions who received MAID.  Having both a professional and personal relationship with the MAID providers offered unique challenges, but ultimately resulted in a more personal MAID experience worthy of being emulated.
Speaker: Nikita Matichuk NP-PHC, MPH, Hospice/Palliative Care Nurse Practitioner, Northwest LHIN
307 CLN
Providing Palliative Care for Adults with Developmental Disabilities
Providing Palliative Care for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

The aim of this workshop is to help increase the confidence of clinicians / caregivers for providing palliative care to adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities using an easy-to-follow framework, improving and overcoming barriers to effective palliative care in this population. 

We will be using case-based discussions, and will introduce validated tools and recommendations to assist with communication, symptom interpretation, treatment decisions, advanced care planning, grief, and important considerations in end-of-life care. 

Speakers: Kyle Sue MD, MHM, MD, CCFP(PC), Clinical Assistant Professor, Memorial University of Newfoundland; Paolo Mazzotta MD, HBSc, MSc, CCFP(PC), Palliative Care Consultant, Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto
308 CLN
Adapting and Implementing the Serious Illness Care Program in the Hospital Setting: Surprises, Successes & Challenges
Adapting and Implementing the Serious Illness Care Program in the Hospital Setting: Surprises, Successes & Challenges

Too often, discussions about goals of care with patients who have serious illness (or with their families) happen days, or sometimes only hours, before death.  As a result, patients who have life-limiting illness may not receive goal-consistent care in the final months or years of life. The aim of the Serious Illness Care Program (SICP) is to achieve more and better conversations about goals of care with patients who have serious illness, and to start these conversations earlier in their illness trajectory. During the last year, an inter-professional team from the Medicine program at Hamilton General Hospital has undertaken a quality improvement initiative to adapt and implement the SICP on the Medicine wards at the Hamilton General Hospital.The workshop will begin with a review of recent research on communication about goals of care, followed by an orientation to the SICP. The main content of the workshop will be sharing our experiences with adapting and implementing the SICP in the hospital setting and will include facilitated small group discussions on participants’ perceptions about our experiences – the degree to which they resonate with the work they do in their clinical settings as well as perceptions about the feasibility and potential utility of the SICP in their settings. The workshop will end with a summary of findings from our ongoing evaluation of the effect of the SICP on patient/family experience, clinician experience, and health resource use.

Authors: Dr. John You MD MSc FRCPC, Associate Professor, McMaster University; Marilyn Swinton MSc, Research Coordinator, McMaster University; Shelley Weniger RPN, Serious Illness Care Program Unit Champion, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation; Sandy Andreychuk RN (EC), MSc (Nursing), MHSc (Bioethics), Clinical Ethicist, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation

Speaker: Dr. John You MD MSc FRCPC, Associate Professor, McMaster University

309 PSBCT
Thrive Anyway: Resilience, Health and Palliative Care (part 1)
Thrive Anyway: Resilience, Health and Palliative Care (part 1)
This workshop will explore individual and collective resilience in the context of palliative care from the perspectives of the patient, family and the healthcare professional.  Various resilience definitions will be considered, and their implications for individuals and families living with life limiting illness.  The presenter’s resilience research, personal narrative and consolidated learnings – as a healthcare professional, family caregiver and patient living with a life limiting illness, will be used as a springboard for discussion and group learning.  Case study, individual reflection and small group discussion will be facilitated.  Participants will collaboratively identify existing strategies and new opportunities for fostering resilience in palliative patients, family members and healthcare professionals.  Opportunities to reflect and discuss individual and team resilience will accompany a review and evaluation of Resilience Inventory tools for both Patients / Families and Healthcare Professionals.
Speaker: Eileen Dahl RP, MDiv, CT, Private Practice and Consulting.
310 PSBCT
Compassionate Presence: Mindfulness Tools for Team-Building and Patient Care (part 1)
Compassionate Presence: Mindfulness Tools for Team-Building and Patient Care (part 1)
Session 1:  In buliding healthy caregiving and working relationships, we need to address not only how we communicate with others, but also how we manage our own internal stress. Mindfulness research shows how training in ‘present-moment’ awareness supports not only our well being, but it helps us down-regulate emotional reactivity, mediate suffering with more acceptance, and enables us to be more present to the needs of others with greater empathy, or relational resonance. Working with skills of “presence”–not knowing, bearing witness, and loving actions–we will explore how to bring mindful communication and compassion to our interactions both with the often “critcial” voice inside of us and with those whom we care and work with.
Session 2:  From the lens of compassionate presence, we look at the systemic issues and team challenges in working in healthcare and end-of-lfie care. Various leadership and team styles can lead to breakdowns in communication and then affect our well-being. By looking at team building from a “Sytems” view and from the view of compassionate leadership, we ask the question: how do we build healthy relationships in the face of distress, grief, and complexity in our workplace settings? What is one thing I can do differently to bring compassion to my team and into my workplace? Being compassionate requires our willingness to present with our own vulerabilty in the face of our shared humanity and to remain open in the face of futility and what appears as unacceptable to us.
Speaker: Rev. Andrew Blake R.P., Buddhist Chaplain, Psychotherapist, Mindfulness Educator,Sarana Institute.
311 PSBCT
Psychosocial and Emotional Challenges of Long-Term Caregiving (part 1)
Psychosocial and Emotional Challenges of Long-Term Caregiving (part 1)
“Psychosocial and Emotional Challenges of Long-Term Caregiving” is an in-depth workshop approaching interpersonal dynamics between caregiver and long-term care patients from the standpoint of Psychology of Loss, Attachment Theory and Anticipatory Grief. It is designed for Bereavement and Grief professionals, Healthcare professionals, and caregivers of long-term care psychiatric or degenerative conditions such as schizophrenia,  Alzheimer’s Disease, or ALS. The workshop highlights the main theoretical principles of Psychoanalysis, Behaviourism, Humanism, Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioural Neurosciences and how these principles can be applied in prolonged Anticipatory Grief aggravated by unaddressed long-standing psychological traits and interpersonal issues, physical exhaustion, compassion burn-out, social isolation and loss of self-identity and quality of life. This in-depth workshop lasts (2-1/2 hours), offered in two (2) consecutive one hour and 15 minute sessions on the same day.
Speaker: Monica Do Coutto Monni B.A. Pol. Sci. M. Psych, Executive Director, Near North Palliative Care Network
312 VOL
Building Emotional Resilience to Address Compassion Fatigue in Hospice Volunteers
Building Emotional Resilience to Address Compassion Fatigue in Hospice Volunteers
Deep emotional and physical exhaustion is a hallmark of compassion fatigue resulting in a shift in a volunteer’s sense of hope and optimism about the future, and the value of their work as a volunteer. The level of fatigue a volunteer experiences can ebb and flow from one day to the next, and even very healthy volunteers with optimal life/work balance, and self-care strategies can experience a higher than normal level of fatigue when they are overloaded, are working with a great deal of traumatic content, or find they are suddenly overwhelmed with situations that are chronically in crisis.
 
The best strategy to address compassion fatigue is to develop excellent self-care strategies, as well as an early warning system that lets the volunteer know that they are moving into a state of overload.
 
This workshop is highly interactive, experiential, and psycho-educational, incorporating lecture, group discussion, and activities. Whether a cup is half full or half empty, the cup can always be refilled; participants will learn how in this workshop.
Speakers: Sheilagh O’Sullivan MACP, RP, Psychotherapist, Private Practice and Hospice Georgian Triangle
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS – SERIES 400
Session # Stream Session Title & Speakers
401 LDP
Who Will Be Driving the Bus?
Who Will Be Driving the Bus?
You have a one out of three shot at guessing who is going to win the Ontario Election on June 7, 2018.  The Ontario Government is an important partner of the hospice palliative care sector, providing funding, policy, guidelines and legislative and regulatory oversight. The election may bring a change in which party leads the Government, or it might not. There might be a majority or a minority. Former MPP and HPCO Government Relations Lead, Jennifer Mossop, will provide a road map to the election and what you need to do to prepare – who to talk to, what to say, when to say it and why to say it.
Speaker: Jennifer Mossop, Coach and Facilitator, Mossop Media
402 LDP
Palliative Care Education for First Nations Communities: Supporting Capacity Development for Palliative Care Services in First Nations
Palliative Care Education for First Nations Communities: Supporting Capacity Development for Palliative Care Services in First Nations
This workshop provides an overview of a palliative care training initiative for First Nations communities led by the Centre for Education and Research on Aging & Health (CERAH) at Lakehead University. The overall goal of this project funded by the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care is to help improve the capacity of First Nations people to provide palliative care in their communities so that community members have the choice to receive care at home.

The workshop describes the process of engaging with 70 First Nations in Ontario to deliver 25 palliative care training workshops. It presents the Palliative Care for Front-Line Workers in First Nations Communities curriculum which was developed at CERAH. This curriculum integrates concepts from the Indigenous Wellness Framework with those of palliative care to provide a holistic foundation for understanding health and balance, while also being inclusive to cultural and spiritual practices. A newly developed, culturally-relevant resource manual Preparing for the Journey: Caring for Indigenous People who are Seriously Ill designed to provide practical tools and resources for care at the bedside will also be discussed. Lastly, the workshop discusses how the education is designed as one step in the larger process of developing comprehensive palliative care services in First Nations communities. This process includes the implementation of the Developing Palliative Care in First Nations Communities Workbook created by the Improving End of Life Care in First Nations Communities project.
Speakers: Holly Prince HBSW, MSW, Research Project Manager, Lakehead University; Jessica Wyatt BEd. MA (English/Women’s Studies), Palliative Care Education Planner, Lakehead University; Kassandra Fernandes MPH, Education Planner Assistant, Lakehead University; Katherine Kortes-Miller MSW, PhD, Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, Lakehead University
403 LDP
Health Care Consent & Advance Care Planning: Essential Clinical and Facilitation Skills (part 2)
Health Care Consent & Advance Care Planning: Essential Clinical and Facilitation Skills
Two essential skills in the practical application of knowledge related to health care consent (HCC) and advance care planning (ACP) involve abilities to translate information that can effectively guide decision making and consent. For ACP, an essential skill is translating a person’s values to directly inform decision making processes. For consent, an essential skill is determining what would make clinical processes noncompliant with the law. Although one is an advanced communication skill and one is an advanced technical skill, both are required if HCC ACP in Ontario is to be person-centred and at the same time meet legal requirements.
For this two-part workshop a unique experiential format will enable participants to personally develop these two essential skills. As well, participants will be introduced to the facilitation tools that can enable skill development in clinicians, policy makers and planners. The session will include critical information to improve understanding of the current HCC ACP climate and practice challenges; will advance knowledge of the linkages between HCC and ACP; and will involve the experiences of applying a person’s values to real life decision-making and the screening of real life clinical processes for legal compliance. Participants will also be introduced to a new Ontario-based e-learning resource that aims to improve HCC ACP related clinical practices.
Speakers: Jeff Myers MD; Nadia Incardona MD; Rachael Halligan MD; Judith Wahl LLB, HCC ACP CoP Leadership Team Members
404 LDP
Leading the Way: HPCO Hospice Standards Framework and Emerging Themes of the HPCO Accreditation process - (part 2)
Leading the Way: HPCO Hospice Standards Framework and Emerging Themes of the HPCO Accreditation process - (part 2)
The HPCO Hospice Standards framework and accreditation process can motivate overall quality improvement within a hospice, promote alignment with organizational policies, and provide a rationale for change to address challenges while ensuring best practice.The purpose of this two-part workshop is to provide an update on the HPCO Hospice Standards framework and a brief overview of the HPCO accreditation process, and to explore the emerging trends and themes of the accreditation process.The first session will focus on the HPCO Hospice Standards framework including the recently updated Day Hospice, Spiritual Care, Grief and Bereavement Support, and Hospice Residence sections.  The current status of the Volunteer Management and Complementary Therapy standards (under review in early 2018) will also be explored. This session provides an opportunity to deepen your familiarity with the HPCO Hospice Standards framework.
The second session will feature members of HPCO’s Accreditation Review Panel and will explore the emerging trends and themes of the accreditation process, which has been operational since June 2015. Attention will be given to both visiting hospice volunteer services and hospice residence services. The presenters will outline key themes they have observed during their tenure as accreditation reviewers.  By reflecting on their experiences, the presenters will draw attention to the value of engaging in the HPCO accreditation process.

Authors:
Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services at HPCO
Charlotte Scott, BSW student intern at HPCO; Nadine Persaud BSW, MSW, RSW, PhD Candidate, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO and Rami Shami BSc, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO
Speakers: Annalise Stenekes BA, BSW, MSW, Manager of Hospice Services, HPCO; Charlotte Scott, BSW student intern, HPCO; Nadine Persaud BSW, MSW, RSW, PhD Candidate, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO
Rami Shami BSc, Accreditation Reviewer, HPCO
405 LDP
The Leadership Crisis: How Spirituality Can Transform Leadership and Workplace Culture
The Leadership Crisis: How Spirituality Can Transform Leadership and Workplace Culture
There is a looming leadership crisis in hospice palliative care. Although there are greater levels of provincial and regional funding available to support hospice care than ever before, many of today’s leaders are not equipped to handle the diverse needs of community-based hospice care. Finding a way to professionalize services and care, meet provincial accreditation standards, remain true to founding principles, while also invigorate overworked teams can seem insurmountable. Working from his recently completed doctoral research, Rev. Dr. Matthew Durham, csb, and Hana Irving will argue that reintroducing and cultivating spirituality in the workplace will dramatically change how leaders, team members, patients, and families experience serve. This presentation will address current leadership challenges, offer suggestions for cultivating a ministry of administration, and offer practical suggestions for transforming workplace culture, and improving employee engagement with spiritual practices and principles.
Speakers: Matthew Durham CSB, Reverend Doctor, The Basilian Fathers of Sandwich, Windsor, ON, Hana Irving BA, BEd, The Basilian Fathers of Sandwich, Windsor, ON
406 CLN
Approaches to early identification of patients who would benefit from palliative care- better tools, better systems (part 1)
Approaches to early identification of patients who would benefit from palliative care- better tools, better systems (part 1)

Palliative care may offer tremendous benefits to patients as they near the end of life, but there are numerous barriers to providing palliative care. One of the most important barriers is patient identification- the simple process of determining which patients will benefit at any given moment. Approaches such as the Gold Standards Framework or SPICT™ have been advocated, but these provider-dependent approaches will always be limited by the operating characteristics of the tools and the unreliability of the process when assigned to frontline care providers.
An improved system would involve reliable, automated tools for identifying such patients and triggering an appropriate response. Several such tools have been developed that use existing datasets with little or no disruption of workflow, and these are undergoing testing in different settings (e.g. in primary care, acute care and long-term care settings). In this workshop, we will review these tools and explore their potential use on a broad scale. We will also present the provincial context, and the direction that the Ontario Palliative Care Network is taking on patient identification. We will also explore the science behind notification systems, and how these can be made more effective for the purpose of changing clinician and patient behaviour

Authors: James Downar MDCM, MHSc (Bioethics), FRCPC, Attending Physician, UHN and Sinai Health System; Tara Walton MPH, Team Lead, Clinician Engagement, Ontario Palliative Care Network; Ahmed Jakda, Ontario Palliative Care Network; Daniel Kobewka, The Ottawa Hospital; Peter Tanuseputro,The Ottawa Hospital; Hsien Seow PhD, McMaster University; John You MD, McMaster University; Pete Wegier PhD, Sinai Health System

Speakers: James Downar MDCM, MHSc (Bioethics), FRCPC, Attending Physician, UHN and Sinai Health System
407 CLN
Understanding The Uniqueness of Paediatric Hospice Care
Understanding The Uniqueness of Paediatric Hospice Care

At the core, adult and paediatric palliative care share philosophies however, when looking at the provision of hospice, there are extensive differences. It is important to champion the uniqueness of paediatric residential hospice care to do service to the children who are living with a life limiting and life-threatening diagnosis.

Many serious medical illnesses that affect children are often unpredictable with non-linear disease trajectories. As such there exists an additional challenge of identifying, with confidence, when the active dying phase begins. Paediatric hospice nursing competencies must also ensure the capacity to care for children at all stages of their development, including maternal peri-natal care.
Furthermore, children are members of many communities including families, neighbourhoods and schools. Their continuing role within these communities should be incorporated in their dying journey (Pediatric Hospice Palliative Care, 2006). Residential facilities must be capable of fostering support for all members to the child’s communities, including siblings.

Unlike their adult counterparts, children and adolescents have yet to develop a life time of memories and therefore the legacy work typically focuses on firsts rather than lasts. It is forward focused with the goal of accumulating memories in a shortened length of time.

Workshop attendees will travel on a journey through the utilization of a case report that will highlight five key differences between adult and paediatric care; the importance or respite, the challenges of identifying the onset of end-of-life, capacity to facilitate family functioning in complex structures and memory making as legacy creation.

Speakers: Sandra Ross RN, BA, CHPCN (c), Director of Clinical Programs, Emily’s House; Kimberly Daffern RN, BscN, Client Care Resource Nurse, Emily’s House
408 CLN
How does our personal knowing about dying and death impact our practice? Let's explore
How does our personal knowing about dying and death impact our practice? Let's explore

This interactive workshop will draw on mindfulness, critical creativity, and principles of interprofessional education to facilitate exploration of our first death experiences as a jumping off point to reflect on our values, beliefs and assumptions about dying and death and how we care for the dying. We will also discuss preceived responsibilities and roles in relation to these beliefs. Creative practices – primarily collaging – will be used not for the sake of creating art to be judged for its aesthetic but for the process of creating in ways that support self-knowledge and democratic communication.

Speaker: Celina Carter RN, MN, PhD Candidate, Dalla Lana School of Public Health
409 PSBCT
Thrive Anyway: Resilience, Health and Palliative Care (part 2)
Thrive Anyway: Resilience, Health and Palliative Care (part 2)
This workshop will explore individual and collective resilience in the context of palliative care from the perspectives of the patient, family and the healthcare professional.  Various resilience definitions will be considered, and their implications for individuals and families living with life limiting illness.  The presenter’s resilience research, personal narrative and consolidated learnings – as a healthcare professional, family caregiver and patient living with a life limiting illness, will be used as a springboard for discussion and group learning.  Case study, individual reflection and small group discussion will be facilitated.  Participants will collaboratively identify existing strategies and new opportunities for fostering resilience in palliative patients, family members and healthcare professionals.  Opportunities to reflect and discuss individual and team resilience will accompany a review and evaluation of Resilience Inventory tools for both Patients / Families and Healthcare Professionals.
Speaker: Eileen Dahl RP, MDiv, CT, Private Practice and Consulting.
410 PSBCT
Compassionate Presence: Mindfulness Tools for Team-Building and Patient Care (part 2)
Compassionate Presence: Mindfulness Tools for Team-Building and Patient Care (part 2)
Session 1:  In building healthy caregiving and working relationships, we need to address not only how we communicate with others, but also how we manage our own internal stress. Mindfulness research shows how training in ‘present-moment’ awareness supports not only our well being, but it helps us down-regulate emotional reactivity, mediate suffering with more acceptance, and enables us to be more present to the needs of others with greater empathy, or relational resonance. Working with skills of “presence”–not knowing, bearing witness, and loving actions–we will explore how to bring mindful communication and compassion to our interactions both with the often “critical” voice inside of us and with those whom we care and work with.

Session 2:  From the lens of compassionate presence, we look at the systemic issues and team challenges in working in healthcare and end-of-life care. Various leadership and team styles can lead to breakdowns in communication and then affect our well-being. By looking at team building from a “Systems” view and from the view of compassionate leadership, we ask the question: how do we build healthy relationships in the face of distress, grief, and complexity in our workplace settings? What is one thing I can do differently to bring compassion to my team and into my workplace? Being compassionate requires our willingness to present with our own vulnerability in the face of our shared humanity and to remain open in the face of futility and what appears as unacceptable to us.

Speaker: Rev. Andrew Blake R.P., Buddhist Chaplain, Psychotherapist, Mindfulness Educator, Sarana Institute

411 PSBCT
Psychosocial and Emotional Challenges of Long-Term Caregiving
Psychosocial and Emotional Challenges of Long-Term Caregiving
“Psychosocial and Emotional Challenges of Long-Term Caregiving (part 2)” is an in-depth workshop approaching interpersonal dynamics between caregiver and long-term care patients from the standpoint of Psychology of Loss, Attachment Theory and Anticipatory Grief. It is designed for Bereavement and Grief professionals, Healthcare professionals, and caregivers of long-term care psychiatric or degenerative conditions such as schizophrenia,  Alzheimer’s Disease, or ALS. The workshop highlights the main theoretical principles of Psychoanalysis, Behaviourism, Humanism, Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioural Neurosciences and how these principles can be applied in prolonged Anticipatory Grief aggravated by unaddressed long-standing psychological traits and interpersonal issues, physical exhaustion, compassion burn-out, social isolation and loss of self-identity and quality of life. This in-depth workshop lasts (2-1/2 hours), offered in two (2) consecutive one hour and 15 minute sessions on the same day.
Speaker: Monica Do Coutto Monni B.A. Pol. Sci. M. Psych, Executive Director, Near North Palliative Care Network
412 VOL
Training Volunteers to Work in Paediatric Palliative Care - Exploring the Differences Between Adult and Paediatric Palliative Care and How Volunteers Support Exceptional Children and their Families
Training Volunteers to Work in Paediatric Palliative Care - Exploring the Differences Between Adult and Paediatric Palliative Care and How Volunteers Support Exceptional Children and their Families
Working with children and their families in paediatric palliative care requires a unique and sometimes complex approach because children are not simply little grown-ups! Kids have very specific needs; they communicate differently depending on their age and abilities and often they are growing and developing in the midst of their illness. Additionally, often children have illnesses that are not seen in adults. When volunteers are only trained to work with palliative adults, we miss the opportunity to educate our service providers, meet the needs of dying children and their families, develop new programs and provide a wider range of hospice palliative care supports to more people in our province.
 
In this workshop we’ll explore the differences and similarities between adult and paediatric palliative care. Next, we’ll teach you how to train your volunteers to work in this special area of hospice care – the modules you should cover, issues to consider, legislative requirements and liability considerations. Also, we’ll share our very own techniques, tips and provide you with tools for your volunteers. Prepare to engage in some therapeutic play techniques, acquire resources, and have fun – after all, paediatric palliative care is about quality of life in a child’s world! Allow us to share our best practices with you in this interactive and informative workshop.
Speakers: Amanda Maragos CRT, Manager of Volunteer Programs, Education and Community Outreach, Volunteer Canada, Volunteer Toronto, HPCO; Heather Shillinglaw ECA, Coordinator of Children’s Programs, HPCO, Sick Kids Hospital
3:00 pm – 4:15 pm CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS – SERIES 500
Session # Stream Session Title & Speakers
501 LDP
Building your Monthly Donor Base
Building your Monthly Donor Base
Session description will be available soon.
502 LDP
The Positive Space Journey at Hospice of Waterloo Region: Striving for Equity at End of Life for the LGBT2SQ+ Community
The Positive Space Journey at Hospice of Waterloo Region: Striving for Equity at End of Life for the LGBT2SQ+ Community

This workshop will provide an opportunity for shared learning in reflection of the Positive Space process taking place at Hospice of Waterloo Region from Sept 2017-Aug 2018. Positive Space in this context refers ensuring an environment free of discrimination and systemic barriers related to sexual orientation and gender identity for staff, volunteers, service users, and community members. The facilitator will provide an overview for workshop participants of the growth and development involved in the Positive Space process at Hospice of Waterloo Region, including a summary of relevant research that has informed the process and standards for best practice, and an interactive discussion on what positive space means for end of life care. Participants will:

  • receive an interactive training on essential LGBT2SQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Two Spirit, Queer/Questioning) concepts and definitions in order to participate actively in this discussion
  • receive direct knowledge of the steps involved in developing a Positive Space as an organization and the implications of this process for service delivery to marginalized community members
  • be encouraged to engage directly with the content of this session in order to benefit from sharing in Hospice of Waterloo Region’s experiential learning during this process that will provide practical tools and suggestions for application within their own organizations.
Speakers: Mandi Cowan MSW RSW, Positive Space Facilitator, Hospice of Waterloo Region; Barb Jones MSW, RSW, Clinical Social Worker, Hospice of Waterloo Region
503 LDP
Applying our organizational values to decision making, Chatham Kent Hospice and MAiD
Applying our organizational values to decision making, Chatham Kent Hospice and MAiD
As Chatham-Kent Hospice (CKH) was opening the doors of its brand new residential hospice in April 2016, Canada’s health care community was awaiting the June 17th legalization of Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD).  Were there people who were hoping to use MAiD to end their life in our Chatham-Kent Community? No one knew. There was quick and persistent prompting from special interest groups for the board to decide against MAiD with a resolute “Never at our hospice ! ”. And of course, there was a sense of urgency with the possibility looming that a request for MAiD would occur before the board’s final decision leaving the board and the care team in a scramble, potentially causing a resident further pain or turmoil. In spite of the weight and pressures for making a quick decision, the CKH board of directors pressed the pause button. They took over a year to educate themselves about MAiD and to consider the nature of the decision itself. What is the criteria a hospice board should use to make such a decision? Should your donor base be a factor, after all hospices rely on donor support? How about the board member’s own individual morality? Where does the value of equity play a part in this highly sensitive issue  ?  Is hospice more about a type of care or about ending suffering? Come with a curiosity as CKH shares the journey that lead to what they believe could only be the right decision for their organization. 
Speaker: Jennifer Wilson BA, Past and Founding Chair of the Chatham Kent Hospice, Chatham Kent Hospice
504 LDP
Building an Engagement Process on Decisions that Will Directly Affect First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Palliative Care
Building an Engagement Process on Decisions that Will Directly Affect First Nations, Inuit and Métis in Palliative Care

The Ontario Palliative Care Network (OPCN) recognizes First Nations, Inuit and Métis (FNIM) communities are critical partners in driving change in the palliative care system. The OPCN, through a dedicated FNIM engagement plan, will engage and plan with FNIM organizations, regional groups and communities to jointly identify gaps in hospice palliative care and report on recommendations to all OPCN Advisory Councils and Regional Palliative Care Networks to inform future annual work plans and to ensure alignment with the Action Plan. The engagement plan is guided by Cancer Care Ontario’s Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit engagement process/infrastructure to ensure respectful and consistent engagement with FNIM. In working toward on-going engagement and respecting FNIM’s role in FNIM Health, this process will follow direction from FNIM communities at the local, regional and provincial levels.


Authors: Joanna Vautour BSW, RSW, Lead on First Nations, Inuit, Métis Engagement, Ontario Palliative Care Network (OPCN) and Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit (ACCU); Usman Aslam MPH, Group Manager, Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit, Prevention and Cancer Control Department, Cancer Care Ontario

Speaker: Joanna Vautour BSW, RSW, Lead on First Nations, Inuit, Métis Engagement, Ontario Palliative Care Network (OPCN), Aboriginal Cancer Control Unit (ACCU)
505 LDP
Integrating Emergency Medical System (EMS) with Palliative Care in the Community across Erie St. Clair
Integrating Emergency Medical System (EMS) with Palliative Care in the Community across Erie St. Clair

This is an interactive workshop on how the Emergency Medical System (EMS) is engaged as a contributing integrated partner in “community palliative care” in Erie St. Clair (ESC). This service delivery model expands capacity to provide palliative care for patients in the community. Two patient stories will be shared to provide context and impact. Presenters will outline 2-3 international/provincial models where EMS is integrated into palliative care. We will showcase 3 different approaches in place, in ESC today, where EMS is a respected partner in palliative care. Presenters representing EMS and Community Palliative care will share care models, systems, tools and education associated with integrated delivery. Learners will develop a draft outline using a  research based quality improvement tool provided, as to how they can initiate or strengthen work on the integration of EMS in palliative care in their community. The session will close with a brief look at the future – how EMS’s role may evolve over time, why and what changes will need to be made to leverage their contribution to better patient/family centered care including technology changes.  Learners will gain an understanding of the benefits and challenges associated with integrating EMS with palliative care in the community. By integrating EMS as a partner in palliative care the experience of jurisdictions working with this model has been improvement in Emergency Room (ER) visit avoidance, decreased hospital admissions, greater patient and family satisfaction and support for patients to remain in their desired care setting. The workshop will demonstrate impact to date, on enhancing palliative care in ESC through integration with EMS. Authors: Cindy Stokes PSM, Patient Service Manager, Erie St. Clair Local Health Integrated Network (ESC LHIN); Ann Brignell RN, CHPCN(c), Palliative Pain and Symptom Management Consultant, Palliative Pain and Symptom Management Program; Matthew Gaudette CMM Executive III, EMS Executive/Operations Manager, Quality Manager, Emergency Medical System; Dr. Glen Maddison MD, Palliative Physician, Sarnia Lambton Hospice and Clinical Co Lead OPCN; Lisa Durocher RN, Primary Care Nurse, Leamington family Health Team; Kelley Phillips RN BSN, CHPCN(C), Palliative Pain and Symptom Managment/Educator/Consultant, Palliative Pain and Symptom Management Program, Southwest Ontario St. Joseph’s Health Care, London, ON

Speakers: Cindy Stokes PSM, Patient Service Manager, Erie St. Clair Local Health Integrated Network (ESC LHIN); Ann Brignell RN, CHPCN(c), Palliative Pain and Symptom Management Consultant, Palliative Pain and Symptom Management Program; Dr. Glen Maddison MD, Palliative Physician, Sarnia Lambton Hospice and Clinical Co Lead OPCN; Lisa Durocher RN, Primary Care Nurse, Leamington family Health Team; Kelley Phillips RN BSN, CHPCN(C), Palliative Pain and Symptom Mangmeent/Educator/Consultant, Palliative Pain and Symptom Management Program, Southwest Ontario St. Joseph’s Health Care, London, ON
506 LDP
Approaches to early identification of patients who would benefit from palliative care- better tools, better systems (part2)
Approaches to early identification of patients who would benefit from palliative care- better tools, better systems (part2)

Palliative care may offer tremendous benefits to patients as they near the end of life, but there are numerous barriers to providing palliative care. One of the most important barriers is patient identification- the simple process of determining which patients will benefit at any given moment. Approaches such as the Gold Standards Framework or SPICT™ have been advocated, but these provider-dependent approaches will always be limited by the operating characteristics of the tools and the unreliability of the process when assigned to frontline care providers.
An improved system would involve reliable, automated tools for identifying such patients and triggering an appropriate response. Several such tools have been developed that use existing datasets with little or no disruption of workflow, and these are undergoing testing in different settings (e.g. in primary care, acute care and long-term care settings). In this workshop, we will review these tools and explore their potential use on a broad scale. We will also present the provincial context, and the direction that the Ontario Palliative Care Network is taking on patient identification. We will also explore the science behind notification systems, and how these can be made more effective for the purpose of changing clinician and patient behaviour.

Authors: James Downar MDCM, MHSc (Bioethics), FRCPC, Attending Physician, UHN and Sinai Health System; Tara Walton MPH, Team Lead, Clinician Engagement, Ontario Palliative Care Network; Ahmed Jakda, Ontario Palliative Care Network; Daniel Kobewka, The Ottawa Hospital; Peter Tanuseputro, The Ottawa Hospital; Hsien Seow PhD, McMaster University; John You MD, McMaster University; Pete Wegier PhD, Sinai Health System

Speakers: James Downar MDCM, MHSc (Bioethics), FRCPC, Attending Physician, UHN and Sinai Health System
507 CLN
The Language We Use : A guide to breaking bad news and difficult conversations (part 1)
The Language We Use : A guide to breaking bad news and difficult conversations (part 1)

This interactive workshop will discuss and explore language and communication techniques that we all must use when having difficult or stressful conversations with patient sand families.  We review common language mishaps we use that can make patients feel uncomfortable.  We will review an approach to breaking bad news as well as communication techniques and questions used to help facilitate and engage in difficult conversations.  We review literature on communication techniques that work and don’t work as well as some of the research and outcomes of Harvey Chochinov’s excellent research on dignity conserving therapy.  Lastly, we provide a safe and interactive opportunity for participants to role play and use some of the new questions, techniques or approaches we have reviewed during the workshop.

Speaker: Alyssa Boyd MD, CCFP, FCFP, (PC), Medical Director, Campbell House Hospice; Assistant clinical professor, McMaster University; Lead Palliative Care Physician, North Simcoe Muskoka Palliative Care Physicians Group
508 CLN
TBD
TBD
Session details will be available soon.
509 PSBCT
Building Bridges Behind the Bars: Increasing HPC Capacity in the Correctional System
Building Bridges Behind the Bars: Increasing HPC Capacity in the Correctional System

For several years, the North Simcoe Muskoka Hospice Palliative Care Network (NSMHPCN) has aimed to partner with Correctional Facilities and Services within their geographic area.  This past year, two NSMHPCN staff members have been involved in a pilot project aimed to provide bereavement support to inmates at Beaver Creek, an all-male minimum/medium level facility in Bracebridge. This specific project was launched to address issues of loss/grief experienced by the inmates, as identified by a facility chaplain.
 
This workshop will include an overview of the project itself, as well as key learnings from the project facilitators.  Using multi-media, interactive self-reflective exercises, and group dialogue, this experience will be used as an example of working towards building a sustainable palliative approach to care within a non-traditional setting. This intermediate-level workshop will be of value to anyone involved in either HPC service delivery or system integration.  
 
 
Outcomes the workshop participant include:
 

  1. Gaining awareness of challenges to providing care to criminally-involved person including personal assumptions, systemic barriers, inter-agency coordination and communication issues
  2. An in-depth look at the high level (and unique) unmet needs of this population that can potentially be met through a palliative approach to care
  3. Collaboratively gaining tools, recommendations and resources for building HPC capacity with a specific marginalized population, within a non-traditional setting
Speakers: Louise Brazier, Bereavement Services Coordinator, North Simcoe Muskoka Hospice Palliative Care Network; Inge Stothers RN, Hospice Palliative Care Nurse Consultant, North Simcoe Muskoka Hospice Palliative Care Network; Amy Pritzker BA, BSW, RSW, Community Engagement Lead, North Simcoe Muskoka Hospice Palliative Care Network
510 PSBCT
Towards Evidence Based Design: A Brief Introduction to Research for Supportive Care Program Development
Towards Evidence Based Design: A Brief Introduction to Research for Supportive Care Program Development
This workshop will take participants through the process used by St. Joseph’s Hospice, London, ON., to establish evidence-based, values-driven, and  person-centered *Supportive Care Services.
 
While making biomedical decisions in clinical settings are often guided by a series of best practices, protocols, and empirical research (Corr & Corr, 2013), understanding evidence and synthesizing research to guide practice for supportive care services is a more convoluted process. There is often a paucity of research in areas relevant to hospice supportive care (Harris & Bordere, 2016), as fields of research are often new and emerging (Northcott & Wilson, 2013), and findings are more likely to be contradictory (Akerman & Statham, 2011).
 
That said, there are processes to guide service design, as well as information one can be aware of to avoid common misinterpretations of research. Contextualizing these processes within Supportive Care Services, we shall guide participants through our methods and encourage them to reflect on how to integrate them into their own organization’s operations.
Speaker: Teresa Bryant R.P., M.A., C.C.C., Director, Supportive Care Services, C.C.C. Certified Canadian Counsellors
511 PBSCT
Spiritual Care in Compassionate Communities
Spiritual Care in Compassionate Communities
“Compassion means going directly to those people and places where suffering is most acute and building a home there.” Henri Nouwen
As part of the accreditation process, Hospice Simcoe became aware of the increased need for day to day spiritual support for residents and families within their care.  In the Spring of 2017, the position of Spiritual Care Coordinator was developed in order to meet the care of residents and families on site and additionally to provide support for staff and volunteers as together we work to create a compassionate community approach.   “Spiritual care” encompasses emotional, psycho-social, physical, and spiritual care and ranges from finding meaning, exploring questions of faith, life and death, self-actualization, love and belonging, and anticipatory grief.   It is about finding a still point in the chaos, discovering gifts of silence, tears, laughter, and bearing witness to struggles, through conversation, sacred rituals, music, art, legacy projects, nature, and physical therapies.  Spiritual care is about creating an environment where what matters most to the resident and family can be nurtured and come alive in the midst of the dying journey.   It is about working together as a team of staff and volunteers to help residents and families experience solace and also to celebrate the life of their loved one as they walk this final journey with them.  The author will present an interactive workshop with concrete and practical ideas to use in your own unique hospice settings.
Speaker: Lori Scholten-Dallimore BA, MDiv, Clergy, Spiritual Care Coordinator, Hospice Simcoe
512 VOL
Hospice Volunteers: An Integral Part of Palliative Outreach
Hospice Volunteers: An Integral Part of Palliative Outreach
Historically, Hospice Volunteers have been at the hub of delivery of in-home Palliative Care services in many Ontario communities.  With the recent introduction and move towards increased government funding for professional Palliative Care Outreach Teams, existing Hospice programs face the challenge of how to successfully integrate the current Visiting Volunteer role into the new professional model.  This workshop aims to guide participants on how to move towards such an integration, through a comprehensive look at one community’s experience – specifically that of Community Care City of Kawartha Lakes Hospice Services and our Palliative Care Community Team (PCCT).  Of significance has been our team’s success in using our Hospice’s volunteer visits as a means of keeping the professional team updated, improving both client outcomes and service delivery, as well as volunteer satisfaction through our team’s increased appreciation of the importance of their contributions to the optimal functioning of the wider care team in delivering in-home Palliative Care.  The workshop will outline our team’s journey to date, beginning with the advent of our community’s PCCT in 2015 and our first steps towards integration, including challenges faced, lessons learned and finishing with a discussion of what’s on the horizon and future directions.
Speaker: Carolyn Parkes BA, Hospice Program Coordinator, Hospice Services, Community Care City of Kawartha Lakes

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

10:30 pm – 11:45 am CONCURRENT WORKSHOP SESSIONS – SERIES 600
Session # Stream Session Title & Speakers
601 LDP
Shifting the Equity Gap: Using Baseline Quality of Life in Palliative Care
Shifting the Equity Gap: Using Baseline Quality of Life in Palliative Care

Utilizing the philosophy, tools, and partnerships of the Windsor-Essex Compassion Care Community (WECCC), this workshop will demonstrate the structures, processes, and outcomes of a model of care that enhances the personal journey of those living with life-limiting and life-altering conditions.  We will explain and show how we have integrated processes in our Intake Department to begin earlier identification of a person’s holistic needs, concerns, and assets through self-assessment of current quality of life.  Interviews with actual patients and volunteers who share their experiences will be presented, along with the process and resource changes needed for support and implementation.  We will also present the outcomes from the WECCC pilot demonstration study that compares aggregated patient-specific results.  Implementation of this model can significantly improve the individual patient and family care experience, and aid in addressing the service equity gap.

 

Authors: Diane Halbgewachs RN, BScN, CD1, Director of Patient and Family Services – Windsor, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County; Kathryn Pfaff PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor; Eleanor Sedge RN, WECCC Coordinator, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County; Linda Sabatini, Co-ordinator of Intake and Clinical Administration, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County

Speakers: Diane Halbgewachs RN, BScN, CD1, Director of Patient and Family Services – Windsor, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County; Eleanor Sedge RN, WECCC Coordinator, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County; Linda Sabatini, Co-ordinator of Intake and Clinical Administration, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County
602 LDP
Addressing Patient, Family, and Caregiver Needs: Ontario Palliative Care Network’s Health Services Delivery Framework
Addressing Patient, Family, and Caregiver Needs: Ontario Palliative Care Network’s Health Services Delivery Framework
There is variation in the availability and delivery of palliative care services within and across Local Health Integration Networks, and less than 60% of Ontarians are known to be receiving these services in their last year of life. The Ontario Palliative Care Network’s Health Services Delivery Framework aims to improve equitable access to palliative care for patients, their families, and caregivers. This framework makes recommendations for palliative models of care for adult patients receiving care within the last year of life and residing at home (i.e. usual place of residence) as a first area of focus. Recommendations are based upon evidence and input from the OPCN, its interdisciplinary Working Group of health care providers, Patient and Family Advisors and multiple stakeholder groups. The framework describes the services related to the assessment, planning, and delivery of palliative care within the eight domains of issues associated with illness and bereavement. It identifies the services, supports, and care that are needed to support patients, families and caregivers within a palliative care team, as well as recommendations for appropriate competencies and implementation considerations. An integrated palliative approach to care, earlier identification at the primary care level, and primary care capacity building are recognized as enablers for the Health Service Delivery Framework.

This workshop provides an opportunity to provide an overview of the development process and emerging recommendations. The primary objective will be to gain feedback on the draft Health Services Delivery Framework from the interdisciplinary perspectives of the workshop participants.
Speakers: Dr. Robert Sauls MD, CCFP(PC), FCFP, Palliative Care Physician, Trillium Health Partners – Credit Valley Hospital and Ontario Palliative Care Network; Robin Cano RN, Manager of Community Care Northern Sub-region, North West Local Health Integration Network and Ontario Palliative Care Network; Dr. Ahmed Jakda MD, MBA Candidate (2018), CFPC (PC), Provincial Clinical Co-Lead, Ontario Palliative Care Network; Medical Director, Palliative Care, Grand River Regional Cancer Centre; Associate Professor, McMaster University, University of Western Ontario
603 LDP
Fifty Years of Wisdom Lessons Learned in End of Life Journey
Fifty Years of Wisdom Lessons Learned in End of Life Journey
The presentation will begin with an “Imagine” story from fifty years ago to demonstrate changes in attitude and health care treatment received by First Nations people.   This will be followed by a brief history, the intergenerational trauma impacts from the way of life being reconstructed, colonization, Residential Schools, efforts to be civilized and assimilated, and being suppressed with no voice and the results taking us to where we are today.  This is why cultural safety is so important and the education needed.
The presentation will cover beliefs related to life, health, dying, death and the importance of death symbols that we still use and find most helpful in grief and bereavement healing.
The greatest gifts given to us to use as Medicine for health and well-being of our body, mind and spirit and  tools to help prepare for this journey are the Teachings of the Medicine Wheel and the seven Grandfather Teachings which will be covered. 
Personal stories as part of “story telling technique” of my experiences with my own family:  parents, brothers, sisters, nephew and nieces, my community and members of other communities where I worked will be interwoven throughout the presentation. 
The lessons that I have learned over the past fifty years of nursing in First Nation communities and my involvements are helping me now to advocate, promote responsibility and help others plan the best of care.
A discussion at the end will engage participants in “what is it that we need to do to advocate for equity”.
Speaker: Rosella Kinoshameg DSL, DOS, Anishinaabe Aadziwin (Traditional Helth) Manager, Noojmowin-Teg Health Centre
604 LDP
A palliative approach to care for non-healthcare workers who work with the homeless
A palliative approach to care for non-healthcare workers who work with the homeless

Access to timely and adequate palliative care remains a challenge, especially for those suffering from structural inequities such as inadequate housing or homelessness, racialization, poverty, stigmatization of substance abuse and mental illness. Compounding the barriers is these people’s deep mistrust of healthcare professionals, resulting from perceived stigma, negative judgement and discrimination. Lack of access to palliative care for these people who are experiencing life-threatening or limiting conditions means that when they do come to their end of life, they are dying in harrowing conditions.

Building on the knowledge that people like outreach workers, housing workers, and addiction workers are best equipped to build trusting relationships with structurally vulnerable people and given their different approach to caring entailing fewer regulations and restrictions, there is an opportunity to foster these relationships to directly improve palliative and end of life services for this population. They lack, however, knowledge and training about palliative care and the palliative approach.

In this workshop, we will describe how, in collaboration with partners in Toronto, Victoria and Calgary, we developed a curriculum on the palliative approach to care for non-healthcare care workers, and a way to deliver it, recognizing the workers’ circumstances and usual style of learning. We used a public meeting, job shadowing, surveys, co-design workshops and service blueprinting. We will review the curriculum with workshop participants and facilitate brainstorming on how the curriculum might be taken up more broadly, and possibly made available to train other groups of people about the palliative approach to care.

Speakers: Paul Holyoke, PhD, Director, Saint Elizabeth Research Centre; Sandra Tudge MSW, Senior Research Associate, Saint Elizabeth Research Centre
605 LDP
Achieving Great Community Care Together; How Hospice Programs Connect with Community Partners in Response to the Rising Need for Palliative Care Programming
Achieving Great Community Care Together; How Hospice Programs Connect with Community Partners in Response to the Rising Need for Palliative Care Programming
In the spring of 2017, Census Canada revealed that in 2016, 16% of Canadians were 65 years old or older (2.2 million people) – a 20% increase between the years 2011-2016! And the number is climbing, quickly. Hospitals and Hospices (residential or community) can expect to see a significant demand on their support services within the next 5-10 years. In fact, many hospice professionals will tell you it has already begun. How do hospices keep up with the demand? And how do we assist caregivers in the home?
 
Simultaneously, we see that various community groups and churches want to help those in need. They have a passion for being caregivers in hospice, are inspired to help others, have resources to share and are looking for opportunities to engage in. Do they want to start a hospice from scratch? In many cases the answer is No.  Why?  Case management, liability, governance and compliance issues seem to be too daunting a task for many to take on.
Why ‘reinvent the wheel’ when there are community based hospices to team up with?
 
This workshop will explore the need for partnerships and offer some expertise on how to build capacity and strengthen programming. How does everybody win? Join us as we share our insights and help you strategize your next move to answer the demands on hospice palliative care programming.
Speakers: Amanda Maragos CRT, Certification in Volunteer Management, Manager of Volunteer Programs, Education & Community Outreach, Volunteer Canada, Volunteer Toronto, HPCO; Jim Wilkins, Financial and Business Managements, Outreach Committee Chair, Grace Church on-the Hill Member of the Toronto Council, Order of St Lazarus; Dr. Robert Boyko MD, CCFP(EM), FCFP, Family Physician, St. John Ambulance, Order of St. Lazarus
606 LDP
Complex Conversations: Bedside Teaching in the Palliative Care Setting
Complex Conversations: Bedside Teaching in the Palliative Care Setting
Teaching Palliative Care requires a broad range of knowledge and skills. Teaching in the Palliative Care setting often takes place with an undergraduate learner or resident in a hospital, a residential hospice or in the patient’s home. These close quarters present unique challenges and opportunities for clinical supervisors and students. Patient and family comfort, emotions, energy and autonomy must be balanced with the ideal setting for students to learn. The goal of this workshop is to assist clinicians in using a variety of methods to enhance learning at the bedside. This interactive workshop will use case vignettes and videos of common complex conversations from Palliative Care to highlight the use of teaching strategies such as teachable moments, the one-minute preceptor, teaching scripts and role modeling. In addition, we will explore ways to help the novice learner participate and remain engaged when complex conversations arise. Giving constructive feedback to learners will also be discussed. By the end of the workshop participants will have an increased comfort level in setting a positive learning environment at the bedside, applying basic teaching principles and enhancing the learning experience for patients, family, students and the teacher.
Speakers: Dr. Risa Bordman MD, CCFP(PC), FCFP, Associate Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto; North York General Hospital; Dr. Donna Spader MD, MScCH, CCFP(PC), FCFP, Assistant Professor, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto; Clinical Director Palliative Care Program, Toronto Grace Health Centre, Toronto; Dr. Christopher Blake BA, MSc, MD, CCFP, Palliative Care Fellow, University of Toronto
607 CLN
The Language We Use : A guide to breaking bad news and difficult conversations (part 2)
The Language We Use : A guide to breaking bad news and difficult conversations (part 2)

This interactive workshop will discuss and explore language and communication techniques that we all must use when having difficult or stressful conversations with patient sand families.  We review common language mishaps we use that can make patients feel uncomfortable.  We will review an approach to breaking bad news as well as communication techniques and questions used to help facilitate and engage in difficult conversations.  We review literature on communication techniques that work and don’t work as well as some of the research and outcomes of Harvey Chochinov’s excellent research on dignity conserving therapy.  Lastly, we provide a safe and interactive opportunity for participants to role play and use some of the new questions, techniques or approaches we have reviewed during the workshop.

Speaker: Alyssa Boyd MD, CCFP, FCFP, (PC), Medical Director, Campbell House Hospice; Assistant Clinical Professor, McMaster University; Lead Palliative Care Physician, North Simcoe Muskoka Palliative Care Physicians Group
608 CLN
Improving your Ability to have Difficult Discussions and Facilitate Meaning-making with Caregivers who Care for a Loved One Receiving Palliative Care at Home
Improving your Ability to have Difficult Discussions and Facilitate Meaning-making with Caregivers who Care for a Loved One Receiving Palliative Care at Home
Of interest to RPNs, RNs, NPs, SWs, Spiritual Care Providers, & Physicians this highly interactive workshop is based on research that has recently been completed. Aimed at participants who are at an intermediate level of learning, this workshop invites participants to attend to the lived experience of palliative caregivers in two ways;  through rich research-based narratives which will be presented in the workshop and also by invoking stories of caregiver experience from participants’ own practices. Gathering these two sources of experience together, this workshop will explore the complex range and residue of emotions and concerns of caregivers who are caring and or who have cared for a loved one at home. Highlighting the knowledge being generated in this way and bringing in relevant literature, the workshop aims to: 1). Sensitize participants regarding the emotional burden borne by caregivers; 2). Potentiate the readiness of health-care professionals to initiate and engage in ‘difficult,’ emotionally-laden discussions with caregivers; 3). Facilitate grieving and healing over the longer term by enabling  the cultivation and preservation of positive processes of meaning-making not only during the caregiving process but also, and importantly, through a bereavement visit after the loved one has passed away.
Speaker: Travis Amell MScN, BScN, RN, CHPCN(C), CDE, Palliative Pain & Symptom Management Consultant, Ontario Palliative Care Consultant’s Network
609 CLN
“I See Dead People”: Encountering the mystical in clinical practice
“I See Dead People”: Encountering the mystical in clinical practice

Health care professionals and volunteers who accompany the dying and the bereaved often encounter the unexplained. The dying may see or hear people that others in the room cannot, or predict with uncanny accuracy when they will die. The bereaved may report detailed life-like dreams that assure the living that all is well with the deceased person. Others describe the scent of their deceased loved ones’ perfume, the aroma of a cigar that their favourite uncle smoked, familiar sounds reminiscent of their loved one, much loved songs coming on the car radio every time they start the engine or a sense of a presence in their room late at  night.
Conversely there are others who long for a sign, the dimes they have heard so much about on the Internet, feathers placed in their path,  or anything that will assure them that life and love do continue. These people often feel bereft. 

This presentation will draw upon the anecdotal experience of two social workers who have practiced in end of life care and  bereavement support for many years as professionals and as volunteers. In concert with these narratives we will examine research findings from the literature about the mystical in palliative care and bereavement. Finally, we will suggest ways to clarify our own beliefs and responses, given such variables as context, boundaries, culture and religion, ethical practice guidelines, and the needs of our clients and their families and friends.

Speakers: Eunice Gorman RN, BSW, MSW, PhD, RSW, Associate Professor, KUC Western University; Laura Lewis BSW, MSW, PhD, RSW, Associate Professor, King’s University College
610 PSBCT
Supporting the Palliative Caregiver
Supporting the Palliative Caregiver
Providing care for others can be rewarding and life-giving.  At the same time, it can also be exhausting – physically, emotionally and spiritually.  Join us for this inspirational workshop as we explore the concept of ‘care’ and reflect on our own experiences of caring for others.  Using self-reflection, discussion, music and video we will learn ways to nourish and sustain ourselves and others who are care partners in palliative care relationships. Whether you are a formal or informal caregiver, volunteer, clinical carer or involved in a program to identify and support those who care, this workshop is for you.  Through this interactive session, participants will have the opportunity to learn from one another as well as the presenter and come away with resources, strategies and information to provide support to those who are care-partners to others.  As we strive for equity in palliative care, caregivers must be included in how they are identified and supported across all sectors including home, community, hospice, hospital, retirement and long term care.
Speaker: Michelle O’Rourke RN, MA, Private consultant – affiliated with ROA Studio Inc. Architects and the Henri Nouwen Society.
611 PSBCT
Pregnancy and Infant Loss Network: Results of a provincial needs assessment
Pregnancy and Infant Loss Network: Results of a provincial needs assessment

Each year in Ontario approximately 37,000 families experience pregnancy and infant loss. Within the healthcare system, many of these families do not receive timely, compassionate, and informed care. This presentation will highlight a provincial needs assessment undertaken between January and March 2017. Over the course of three months, in-person focus groups were held in 14 rural, urban, and First Nations communities with bereaved families and care providers. An online survey for bereaved families also ran concurrently.

This session will describe the findings from the focus groups and online survey, bring information about a Phase 2 needs assessment aimed at health equity and access to all families in Ontario, and will engage and stimulate participants’ thinking about possible innovative ways to address existing gaps in care in their own settings to advance the care of families who experience perinatal bereavement. The session will also highlight advocacy work during the passing of provincial legislation aimed at protecting the needs of families experiencing perinatal loss, the rst of its kind in North America.

Speaker: Michelle La Fontaine B.A.A, CLStDipl., Program Manager, Pregnancy and Infant Loss (PAIL) Network
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